Mary's Veggie Garden

December 28, 2015

12/28/2015 Harvest Monday

Filed under: Carrots,Celeriac,Vegetables — marysveggiegarden @ 11:29 am

December’s unseasonably warm weather has continued for another week, with new record high temperatures recorded up and down the east coast of the USA. Dec. 24 I biked in shorts. On Christmas day we took a family ride over the Walkway over the Hudson. The rail trail was almost empty but the Walkway was crowded with families enjoying the warm weather.

Returning from the Walkway, I stopped at the garden for a final harvest.  The forecast for the next week is for cold and wet, so I took advantage of the warm, cloudy day to harvest the remainder of  my celeriac.

Celeriac 7.5 pounds

Celeriac 7.5 pounds

Here’s the celeriac, after considerable trimming and scrubbing. There are two varieties, Brilliant and Large Smooth Prague. My friend Norma, at http://gardentowok.com/ started lots of Large Smooth Prague for the gardens at Locust Grove and I ended up with the extras. The leftovers were the smallest of her plants, but they were still bigger than my Brilliant plants.  Last winter was very cold and my plants got a very slow start in the basement. So the larger roots are Large Smooth Prague and the smaller ones are Brilliant.

The warm weather isn’t so good for the vegetables stored in my ‘root cellar’. I dug my carrots in early November. Bolero, a storage variety, is doing OK but the Yaya’s are growing vigorously. The Yaya variety is better for eating fresh from the garden, rather than for storing.

Yaya carrots,12/16/17 after about 7 weeks of storage

Yaya carrots on 12/26, stored about 7 weeks

The condensation on the inside of the bucket is from the carrots. Yayas are quite juicy. There is an upside down plate in the bottom of the bucket to hold the carrots out of the condensation. I trimmed the foliage from all the carrots while moving them to a dry bucket.

Bolero carrots, stored about 6 weeks

Bolero carrots on 12/28 stored, about 6 weeks.

Notice there is much less condensation in the Bolero bucket: the Boleros are not as juicy. There are also a lot fewer Boleros sprouting. Next summer I should plant fewer Yayas and probably few carrots overall.

Advertisements

5 Comments »

  1. Nice celeriac! Interesting, I didn’t realize carrots released moisture – I didn’t have very many so mine all fit into the fridge for storage. Thanks for the info in case I ever have enough to store in the cellar.

    Comment by Susie — December 28, 2015 @ 11:54 am | Reply

  2. The celeriac looks really good. It seems like a big investment in time to get a crop if you have to start them in the winter to harvest the next winter. I’ve been marveling at the reports of warm weather in your area and a bit envious since it has been not unseasonably cold and wet here.

    Comment by Michelle — December 28, 2015 @ 12:10 pm | Reply

    • I could have harvested sooner, back in October. But yes, it is a long growing crop. Luckily it doesn’t seem to have any pests so I can leave it.

      Comment by marysveggiegarden — December 28, 2015 @ 1:50 pm | Reply

  3. Interesting observation on the carrots in storage. Our cellar is way too warm to store carrots, so we have to put them in the refrigerator. My potatoes are sprouting in the cellar, so I am trying to use them up.

    Comment by Dave @ OurHappyAcres — December 28, 2015 @ 2:22 pm | Reply

  4. As always, I found your blog informative and interesting.
    Glad that you and your family enjoyed a healthy Christmas day biking in the warm weather.

    Comment by Connie — December 29, 2015 @ 11:30 am | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: