Mary's Veggie Garden

July 17, 2017

July 17, 2017 Community Gardens Plot Tour and Harvest

Filed under: Cabbage,Floating Row Cover,Lettuce,Onions,Seeds,Sweet Potatoes,Tomatoes,Vegetables — marysveggiegarden @ 6:40 pm
Tags:

Yesterday, I photographed my garden plot at the Vassar Farm Community Gardens. My plot is 20’x40′ laid out in beds 3.5’x14′ with 18″  wide beds along the fence.

This lovely weed, possibly a white heath aster, greets me at the gate. The old 2×4’s weigh down cardboard that keeps weeds out of the fence.

Overwintered Swiss Chard blooms just inside the gate.

Swiss chard is a biennial, blooming its second year. Sown May 2016, this plant survived the winter under a heap of abandoned light weight floating row cover. In forty years of growing chard, this is the first I’ve seen survive the winter. I’ve often wondered what happened the second summer.

Peppermint Swiss chard before harvest.

Two hours later – chard after harvesting 4 pounds.

The floating row cover protects broccoli, cabbage and kale from the ravages of cross-striped cabbage worms and imported cabbage worms. Background – my preferred vehicle for traveling to the Farm.

 

Foreground – sweet potatoes; back – cucumbers. The cucumbers had been growing under a row cover for protection against the bacterial wilt spread by cucumber beetles. I uncovered them for pollination when they started flowering a couple days ago.

 

A shade cover keeps a new carrot planting moist while germinating.

The shade cover is a piece of concrete reinforcing wire covered by a piece of old sheet. I sewed leftover bias binding to the sheet corners to use as ties.  I start a new section of carrots every 2 weeks during June and July. Even with shade I water the seed bed every 2-3 days. Germination is excellent under the cover.

The tiny plants in the foreground are more sweet potatoes. They are growing very slowly this year. The row cover protects cabbages and Chinese cabbages. Edemame soy beans and  corn are growing in the bed behind the row cover. Butternut squash is just beyond and tomatoes are last. The tomato plants are short and bushy because they were shredded by hail in early June.

The west side – Copra and Cabernet onions are against the fence. Bush beans are growing & flowering under the row cover for protection against Mexican Bean beetles.  Behind the beans are a few beets and a planting of summer crisp lettuces.

In the front are two blooming Cimmaron Romaine lettuce plants. Behind are my first carrot planting and more onions.

I try to harvest all the lettuce before it bolts but I always plant too much. I allow the last plants that bolt to set seed. I want to select for plants with delayed bolting when I save seed.

Harvest is the last job before I bike home. I try to keep the food in the shade of the bike, but there is precious little shade at noon. Shown here: 4 pounds of chard, some Lactinato kale and a bag of broccoli – one head and lots of side shoots. The onions and lettuce didn’t make the picture and the strawberries were eaten.

 

Advertisements

June 19, 2017

Harvest Monday June 19, 2017

Filed under: Broccoli,Cabbage maggots,Kohlrabi,Peas — marysveggiegarden @ 11:57 am
Tags:

Harvests this week have featured lettuce and peas, followed by peas and lettuce with a  sprinkling of Daikon radishes and the occasional kohlrabi. The highlight is the first broccoli, harvested yesterday.

Green Magic broccoli and Kolibri kohlrabi. The two broccoli heads weighed in at  14.1 oz and 18.1 oz. The spots on the kohlrabi were caused by the hail two weeks ago.

I really like Green Magic. It produces big heads on 2′ plants. The flavor is good. It produces nicely sized side shoots through September.

Unfortunately I also have a major problem with Green Magic and I’m wondering if anyone else has seen this problem. I grow my own plants from seed, indoors, under lights. Last year, 2016, the plants developed some sort of infection. It looked like a gray mold. I washed the growing area and replaced the light bulbs. This year my first 6 pack of plants grew great. My second 6-pack “failed to thrive”.  While still small, the leaves seemed to loose their chlorophyll and turned light green and the plant stopped growing. I discarded plants until there was only 1 healthy plant left for transplanting. I’m thinking maybe this stage was followed by mold last year. All the seed was from the same packet. I’ve grown broccoli from seed for decades and this is a new problem. I have a friend, another master gardener, who is also having problems. I asked her to check the variety and she is also growing Green Magic.

Lettuce: Cimmaron Romaine and 2-Star Looseleaf.  I removed a lot of hail damaged lower leaves after harvest.

 

Today’s snow pea harvest. L-R Little Snowpea White Pea, Little Snowpea Purple Pea, Snowbird, and Cascadia. The Cascadia snap peas are in the colander with the Snowbird peas. Top Alpine Daikon radish. This is the first of the Alpine daikons to bolt, so it is harvest time whether or not they are full sized.

The Snowbird snow peas have been going strong for 2 weeks and are due for a rest. The Little Snowpea Purple Peas are at their peak. The snap peas were planted a week after the snow peas and harvest is just starting.

The greens from the broccoli, radishes, and kohlrabi were chopped and mixed into the morning egg scramble.

Kolibri kohlrabi. All should be harvested. We are supposed to get a deluge this afternoon, so I’ll  use the time to freeze peas and kohlrabi.

Note the black plastic disk under the bottom center kohlrabi. It is the bottom cut from a plastic nursery pot. I use these disks to protect the plants from cabbage maggots. Cabbage maggots are the tiny white worms often found tunneling in radishes. With broccoli and kohlrabi plants the maggots eat the outside surface of the root and the plant wilts and dies. When I transplant kohlrabi, or any Brassica which will not be protected by a row cover, I place one of these plastic disks on the ground around the stem. All these kohlrabi were protected when transplanted, but I removed the disks a week ago so they could be used to protect some new kale transplants.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.